wsre_cove_w_2.png youtube.png pinterest.png instagram.png twitter_w-01.png facebook_w-01.png newbuttondonate_3 copy.png__210x10000_q85_subsampling-2.png

WSRE will share local eclipse coverage with NOVA producers for special day-of-event presentation on PBS

Posted by Mary Riker on

NOVA “Eclipse Over America” airs Monday at 8 p.m. on WSRE

PENSACOLA, Fla., August 17, 2017―On Monday, Aug. 21, America’s eyes will be glued to the skies as the mainland United States experiences the first total solar eclipse since 1979, and the first to cross the USA since 1918. PBS’ award-winning science series, NOVA, produced by WGBH Boston, will capture the spectacular event in a special presentation to air hours after it takes place. WSRE will broadcast “Eclipse Across America” at 8 p.m. on Monday with hopes of seeing the station’s own video of Pensacola eclipse watchers appear on the show.

NOVA’s most extensive fast-turnaround film to date, “Eclipse Over America” will be the ultimate companion to this spectacular celestial event. NOVA will follow teams working on the forefront of solar science and solar storm detection, incorporating immersive CGI animation to reveal the sun’s secret mechanisms, stunning sequences of the eclipse itself, NASA footage and more. NOVA is collaborating with several public television stations, including WSRE, who will provide footage shot in their own back yards, illustrating the excitement the eclipse generates across the nation.

“NOVA’s producers have invited us to provide five minutes of footage from Pensacola,” said WSRE Producer/Director Ted King. “We’re planning to capture footage from the PSC planetarium, Blue Wahoos Stadium and Pensacola Beach in hopes they will use a portion of it for the national broadcast.”

Pensacola State College astronomer Lauren Rogers and retired professor Wayne Wooten are expected to host a public viewing of the partial eclipse outside the college’s planetarium; the Pensacola Blue Wahoos have invited the community to witness the eclipse from the stadium; and NOVA specifically requested footage from Pensacola Beach.

“They have a small amount of time to insert video coming in from all over the country. We will do all we can for Pensacola to be included on this NOVA special, and if it happens, that would be a pretty big deal,” said King.

This extraordinary cosmic spectacle will pass through 13 states, and everyone in the continental U.S. will have the opportunity to see at least a partial eclipse, making it the most widely viewed American eclipse of all time. Commencing at 12:15 p.m. CDT, a lunar shadow 73 miles wide will take one hour and 33 minutes to travel from Oregon on the west coast to South Carolina on the east, allowing continuous observation for 90 minutes.

“NOVA is thrilled to provide our audiences across the U.S. with an up close, in-depth look at this extraordinary event,” said Paula S. Apsell, Senior Executive Producer of NOVA. “We are excited to share the experience with viewers and provide a scientific perspective on the celestial mechanism behind this total solar eclipse and what it can tell us about the inner workings of our sun.”

This extraordinary cosmic spectacle will pass through 13 states, and everyone in the continental U.S. will have the opportunity to see at least a partial eclipse, making it the most widely viewed American eclipse of all time. Commencing at 10:15 a.m. PDT (12:15 p.m. CDT), a lunar shadow 73 miles wide will take one hour and 33 minutes to travel from Oregon on the west coast to South Carolina on the east, allowing continuous observation for 90 minutes.

NOVA “Eclipse Over America” will be available to stream the morning after broadcast on all station-branded PBS platforms, including PBS.org and PBS apps for iOS, Android, Roku, Apple TV, Amazon Fire TV and Chromecast. WSRE will air an encore presentation on Wednesday, Aug. 23 at 7 p.m.

Media Relations Contact:
Mary Riker
mriker@wsre.org